Biology

Meet Sao Tome Grosbeak, World’s Largest Canary

A critically endangered bird species called the São Tomé grosbeak is the world’s largest canary, 50% heavier than the next largest species, according to a new study published in the journal Ibis. The São Tomé grosbeak (Crithagra concolor). Image credit: Alexandre Vaz / Melo et al, doi: 10.1111/ibi.12466. The São …

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Three New Chameleon Species Discovered in Central Africa

A team of herpetologists, led by Dr. Eli Greenbaum, associate professor of biological sciences at the University of Texas at El Paso, has discovered three new species of chameleons. The Rugege highlands forest chameleon (Kinyongia rugegensis). Image credit: Eli Greenbaum. The reptile trio — historically thought to be a single …

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New Species of Cottontail Rabbit Identified: Sylvilagus parentum

A new species of cottontail rabbit (genus Sylvilagus) has been described from the lowlands of western Suriname by Portland State University Professor Luis Ruedas. The Suriname lowland forest cottontail (Sylvilagus parentum). Image credit: UOL / IUCN. Prof. Ruedas made the discovery after studying rabbit specimens at the Naturalis Biodiversity Center …

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Chimpanzees Show ‘Cumulative Culture’

Chimpanzees share our human ability to amass knowledge, a new study led by a University of St Andrews researcher has found. Chimpanzees share the human capacity to build on the knowledge of others. Image credit: Marcel Langthim. The ability to achieve great feats by building on the work of others …

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New Glassfrog Species Discovered in Ecuador

Herpetologists are claiming they have discovered a new species of frog living in the Amazonian lowlands of Ecuador. The Yaku glassfrog (Hyalinobatrachium yaku) in life. Top row: adult male, holotype, in dorsal and ventral view. Bottom row: adult male, paratype. Image credit: Guayasamin et al, doi: 10.3897/zookeys.673.12108. The glassfrogs, or …

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Did Hunter-Gatherers Intentionally Domesticate Wild Plants?

New research from the University of Sheffield, UK, has shed light on how hunter-gatherers adopted agriculture and how crops were domesticated to depend on people. Ploughing with a yoke of horned cattle in Ancient Egypt. Domesticated crops have been transformed almost beyond recognition in comparison with their wild relatives — …

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