Paleontogly

‘Rise of Algae’ in Cryogenian Oceans Led to Appearance of First Complex Organisms, Study Says

The rapid rise of marine planktonic algae 659-645 million years ago (Cryogenian period), between the Sturtian and Marinoan ‘snowball Earth’ glaciations, created food webs with more efficient nutrient and energy transfers, driving ecosystems towards larger and increasingly complex organisms, according to new research. Cryogenian Earth. Image credit: NASA. The study, published …

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Cretaceous Flowers Found Preserved in Burmese Amber

In a paper published recently in the journal Palaeodiversity, U.S. paleontologists described a new species of angiosperm flower, Tropidogyne pentaptera, found in seven pieces of 99-million-year-old (mid-Cretaceous) amber excavated from a mine in Myanmar (also known as Burma). Tropidogyne pentaptera, holotype. Scale bars -1 mm. Image credit: George O. Poinar, …

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New Prehistoric Crocodile Identified: Lemmysuchus obtusidens

An international team of paleontologists has identified a new teleosaur and named it after Ian ‘Lemmy’ Kilmister, frontman of the band Motörhead. A paleoartist’s reconstruction of Lemmysuchus obtusidens. The reconstruction contains details relating to Motörhead, with the pattern on the head based on the band’s Snaggletooth logo. Image credit: Mark …

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Gliding Proto-Mammals Lived among Jurassic Dinosaurs

Dinosaurs that roamed what is now China some 160 million years ago had two ‘flying’ neighbors — strange creatures with long limbs, long hand, foot fingers, and wing-like membranes for tree-to-tree gliding. Named Maiopatagium furculiferum and Vilevolodon diplomylos, these prehistoric animals are the earliest known gliders in the long history …

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Two New Cretaceous Dinosaur Species Discovered in Canada

Paleontologists have announced the discovery of two new troodontid dinosaur species, Latenivenatrix mcmasterae and Stenonychosaurus inequalis, based on remains found in Alberta, Canada. Life reconstruction of Latenivenatrix mcmasterae. Image credit: Julius Csotonyi. In 2014, University of Alberta paleontology student Aaron J. van der Reest discovered an intact troodontid pelvis in …

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